Photo of K. Joy Chin

Joy Chin is a principal in the Long Island, New York, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. She is a member of the firm’s Board of Directors, co-leader of the firm’s Affirmative Action, OFCCP and Government Contract Compliance practice group, and co-leader of the firm's Pay Equity group.

In recognition of the 15th anniversary of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, the Biden Administration has released a proposal that would prohibit federal contractors from using a job applicant’s prior salary history when setting pay and require federal contractors to post the expected salary range in its job postings. >>Learn more here.

Pay transparency obligations are in effect in New York State, and the state Department of Labor has issued employer guidance and proposed regulations. As of September 17, 2023, covered employers must include in any advertisement for a job, promotion, or transfer opportunity the minimum and maximum annual salary or hourly rate that the employer believes

New York Governor Kathy Hochul has signed an amendment to the New York State Pay Transparency Law that modifies the applicability of the law, lessens an employer’s recordkeeping requirements, and clarifies what constitutes an “advertisement.” The September 17, 2023, effective date remains unchanged, as does the requirement to include the job description in an

Effective September 17, 2023, covered employers in New York State will have pay transparency obligations related to job advertisements under legislative bill S.9427-A/A.10477. Governor Kathy Hochul signed the bill on December 21, 2022.

New York joins other states like California and Washington in enacting pay transparency requirements in 2022. The passage also complicates compliance

Effective November 1, 2022, covered New York City employers will need to comply with the New York City pay transparency law. This legislation requires disclosure of salary ranges in advertisements, rather than offer letters or upon request from applicants or employees. The city law is like enactments in other jurisdictions, such as California, Colorado

The New York City Council has pushed back implementation of the salary transparency law from May 15, 2022, to November 1, 2022.

On January 15, 2022, New York City enacted legislation requiring all covered employers to include a minimum and maximum salary for the position advertised. The new law was set to go into effect

The New York City Commission on Human Rights published guidance for the recently enacted Local Law 32 of 2022, which requires salary transparency in job advertisements, effective May 15, 2022. New York City enacted legislation on January 15, 2022, requiring all covered employers to include a minimum and maximum salary for the position advertised. Unfortunately,

As New York City Mayor Eric Adams did not take action within 30 days of receipt from the New York City Council, the Council’s legislation requiring most New York City employers to include salary ranges on job advertisements has become law.

This legislation is similar to recent enactments in numerous other jurisdictions, including Colorado and