The California Department of Industrial Relations has issued new FAQs to clarify its interpretation of California’s new pay transparency requirements.

Among other updates, the new FAQs provide additional guidance on:

  • Coverage. Employers with at least 15 employees – and at least one employee in California – must include the pay scale on job

On September 27, 2022, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed Senate Bill (SB) 1162, which requires certain employers to provide more pay transparency on pay scales and expands pay data reporting obligations for other employers. The new obligations take effect on January 1, 2023. Previously, under California law, employers had to provide an applicant with

On February 17, the California Senate introduced SB 1162, which—if passed—could give California the most aggressive pay transparency laws in the nation. Again. The draft California law enhances two common state law pay transparency strategies: proactive wage range disclosure and pay data reporting.

Proactive Wage Range Disclosure

California was the first state in

After many delays, employers nationwide just filed their 2020 EEO-1 reports in November.  But it’s already time for California employers to begin preparing their annual pay data submission to the Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH). The Background In 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law Senate Bill (SB) 973,…

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The push for pay equity has moved beyond prohibiting pay discrimination and into requiring employers encourage pay transparency for applicants and employees.

At the federal level, the National Labor Relations Act can protect discussions involving compensation as concerted activity. For federal contractors, OFCCP prohibits policies that discourage pay transparency. Many states have followed suit —