The long-awaited regulations from the Illinois Department of Labor (IDOL) governing the amendments to the Illinois Equal Pay Act (IEPA) were published, further clarifying the practical implications of obtaining an equal pay registration certificate under the IEPA.

Background

The 2021 amendments to Section 11 of the IEPA require businesses with at least 100 individuals employed

Effective September 17, 2023, covered employers in New York State will have pay transparency obligations related to job advertisements under legislative bill S.9427-A/A.10477. Governor Kathy Hochul signed the bill on December 21, 2022.

New York joins other states like California and Washington in enacting pay transparency requirements in 2022. The passage also complicates compliance

Effective November 1, 2022, covered New York City employers will need to comply with the New York City pay transparency law. This legislation requires disclosure of salary ranges in advertisements, rather than offer letters or upon request from applicants or employees. The city law is like enactments in other jurisdictions, such as California, Colorado

The New York City Council has pushed back implementation of the salary transparency law from May 15, 2022, to November 1, 2022.

On January 15, 2022, New York City enacted legislation requiring all covered employers to include a minimum and maximum salary for the position advertised. The new law was set to go into effect

The New York City Commission on Human Rights published guidance for the recently enacted Local Law 32 of 2022, which requires salary transparency in job advertisements, effective May 15, 2022. New York City enacted legislation on January 15, 2022, requiring all covered employers to include a minimum and maximum salary for the position advertised. Unfortunately,

Because the judge who authored the ruling died before the decision was issued, the Ninth Circuit erred in counting him as a member of the majority, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Yovino v. Rizo, No. 18-272 (Feb. 25, 2019). On this technicality, the Supreme Court vacated the Ninth Circuit ruling that prior salary alone

Joining New York City, Albany County, and Westchester County, Suffolk County has become the latest jurisdiction in New York to pass a bill that prevents employers from inquiring into the salary and benefits history of job applicants.

Designed to establish pay equality and to “break the cycle of wage discrimination,” the Restricting Information on Salaries